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MultitrackStudio by Bremmers Audio Design
audio/MIDI multitrack recording software for Windows/Mac and iPad
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News:
August 19, 2017
MultitrackStudio for iPad 2.7 released

August 14, 2017
MultitrackStudio 8.4 released











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Manual : Audio Filesprev next

Audio Files

The following audio file formats are supported:

  • .WAV files: 16 bit mono or stereo (Pro edition also supports 24 bit, 32 bit and 32 bit floating point files).
  • .AIF files: 16 bit mono or stereo (Pro edition also supports 24 bit, 32 bit and 32 bit floating point files).
  • .GJM files: 16 bit mono using lossless compression (Pro edition also supports 24 bit).
  • .GJS files: 16 bit stereo using lossless compression (Pro edition also supports 24 bit).
  • .M4A files: 16 bit mono or stereo files using lossy compression.
  • .MP3 files: 16 bit mono or stereo files using lossy compression.
  • .AEM files: contain references to audio files to play. .AEM files are application-generated (see Understanding Audio Editing).

The Windows version can open existing .aac, .ac3, .mp4 and .wma files (requires Windows 7 or newer).

The Mac version can open existing .aac, .ac3, .mp4, .aifc, .caf, .snd, .au and .sd2 files.

WAV files

WAV files can be used with almost any program that supports audio. You need a WAV file to create an audio CD.

AIF files

AIF files are similar to WAV files. They're widely supported on Mac computers, but rare on Windows.

GJM/GJS files

GJM/GJS files use lossless compression to reduce file size. The compression algorithm works best if the audio signal doesn't contain loud treble parts. This works well for multitrack recording since tracks typically have many silent or soft parts so the file size can easily be reduced to about 70% of its original size.

Note that sound quality isn't impaired in any way by the compressing action: if you save a .WAV file in .GJM format and then save that file in .WAV format again you get exactly the same file.

M4A files

M4A files use a lossy compression algorithm that degrades sound quality. Sound quality tends to be slightly better than MP3.

The Mac version supports lossless 'ALAC' compression.

Note: M4A support isn't available on Windows Vista and Windows XP

MP3 files

MP3 files use a lossy compression algorithm that degrades sound quality. The resulting file size is 3..9% of the original size. This makes MP3 the format of choice if you want to publish your songs on the internet, or if you want to send them via email.

Every time a new MP3 file is created the audio quality can be chosen (Medium, High or Very High). High and Very High quality files use the full samplerate (44.1 or 48 kHz), Medium quality files will use half the samplerate (22.05 or 24 kHz).

An MP3 encoder is required in order to create MP3 files.

Windows: Windows 8 and newer come with an MP3 encoder, so you don't have to do anything. Windows XP includes an ACM codec that supports creating medium quality files.
A .dll is required for other Windows versions (this will work with the aforementioned Windows versions as well):
The 32-bit version expects a 'lame_enc.dll' file in the C:\Program Files\MtStudio folder (C:\Program Files (x86)\MtStudio on 64 bit Windows).
The 64-bit version expects a 'lame_enc64.dll' file in the C:\Program Files\MtStudio folder.
If there's no dll file any ACM codecs which are on your system will be used. Newer Windows versions don't come with an ACM encoder.
In Windows 8 and newer this

Mac: A 'libmp3lame.dylib' file is expected in the user's Library/Application Support/MultitrackStudio folder. You can achieve this by dropping the libmp3lame.dylib file on the main window.

You can search the web for the files mentioned.

Legacy files

Existing files of these obsolete types can still be read:
  • .LST files: pre MultitrackStudio 5 equivalent of .aem files.
  • .SAM files: 16 bit mono headerless raw data files.
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Last update: August 19, 2017